Services
Atlanta Mold Inspector, Testing

Over The last few years during my Atlanta Home Inspections, we have seen a dramatic increase of mold related issues. This was due to the large amount of increase of foreclosed homes. It is common to find problems with mold in older homes, crawlspaces’ and vacant homes. It can be a problem in any home if the conditions are right. Mold have been and are always here. Its part of nature. You and I are breathing molds right now. Many molds are good. The invention of penicillin was from mold. I love blue cheese. The “blue” is mold. Molds help break down wood, leafs, foods etc. in the environment. There are some so called “bad” molds. These in higher concentrations for some people, especially for those with compromised immune systems, respiratory problems like asthma and others may be a health concern. Molds need 3 things to grow. Moisture-A Food Source-Time.

It is important to know we are not a mold Expert. I don’t know of any Atlanta Home Inspectors that are experts. In fact, there are not a whole lot of experts anywhere. And when you do find the experts, they don’t all agree about the molds. It is rather a newer “learning process”, and we have only scratch the surface in our understanding of molds and associated health risk. There is a lot of bad information about molds and I try and not give any wrong information here. It is common during my Atlanta Home Inspections, when we find fungal growth in the home, we areasked will mold make me sick? Especially if they see it and its “Black Mold”. Molds come in a variety of colors and just because its “black mold” does not mean its bad. We have seen pink, green, yellow etc. molds. The only way to tell if its mold is to have samples taken and the samples tested at the laboratory. Call your Atlanta Mold Inspector today for a free quote, 404-786-3794. Under most all circumstances, mold problems can be corrected.

Atlanta Home Inspection Mold Testing

Atlanta Mold Inspection Needs. 404-786-3794

Basic Mold Cleanup

The key to mold control is moisture control. It is important to dry water damaged areas and items within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth. If mold is a problem in your home, clean up the mold and get rid of the excess water or moisture. Fix leaky plumbing or other sources of water. Wash mold off hard surfaces with detergent and water, and dry completely. Absorbent materials (such as ceiling tiles & carpet) that become moldy may have to be replaced.

Ten Things You Should Know About Mold

  1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with elevated mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.
  2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.
  3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
  4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.
  5. Reduce indoor humidity to decrease mold growth by: venting bathrooms, dryers, and other moisture-generating sources to the outside; using air conditioners and de-humidifiers; increasing ventilation; and using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing, and cleaning.
  6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
  7. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles, that are moldy, may need to be replaced.
  8. Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.
  9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (i.e., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks, or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).
  10. Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.

Asthma and Mold
Homes and Molds

The EPA publication, “A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home” , is available here in HTML.  This Guide provides information and guidance for homeowners and renters on how to clean up residential mold problems and how to prevent mold growth.  A printed version will be available soon.

Biological Pollutants in Your Home - This document explains indoor biological pollution, health effects of biological pollutants, and how to control their growth and buildup. One third to one half of all structures have damp conditions that may encourage development of pollutants such as molds and bacteria, which can cause allergic reactions — including asthma — and spread infectious diseases.  Describes corrective measures for achieving moisture control and cleanliness.  This brochure was prepared by the American Lung Association and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. EPA Document Reference Number 402-F-90-102, January 1990.

Moisture Control

Get rid of moisture to prevent mold in your home!
Atlanta Mold Inspectors

Elevated Moisture and Mold

Water in your home can come from many sources. Water can enter your home by leaking or by seeping through basement floors. Showers or even cooking can add moisture to the air in your home. The amount of moisture that the air in your home can hold depends on the temperature of the air. As the temperature goes down, the air is able to hold less moisture. This is why, in cold weather, moisture condenses on cold surfaces (for example, drops of water form on the inside of a window). This moisture can encourage biological pollutants to grow.

There are many ways to control moisture in your home:

  • Fix leaks and seepage. If water is entering the house from the outside, your options range from simple landscaping to extensive excavation and waterproofing. (The ground should slope away from the house.) Water in the basement can result from the lack of gutters or a water flow toward the house. Water leaks in pipes or around tubs and sinks can provide a place for biological pollutants to grow.
  • Put a plastic cover over dirt in crawlspaces to prevent moisture from coming in from the ground. Be sure crawlspaces are well-ventilated.
  • Use exhaust fans in bathrooms and kitchens to remove moisture to the outside (not into the attic). Vent your clothes dryer to the outside.
  • Turn off certain appliances (such as humidifiers or kerosene heaters) if you notice moisture on windows and other surfaces.
  • Use dehumidifiers and air conditioners, especially in hot, humid  climates, to reduce moisture in the air, but be sure that the appliances themselves don’t become sources of biological pollutants.
  • Raise the temperature of cold surfaces where moisture condenses. Use insulation or storm windows. (A storm window installed on the inside works better than one installed on the outside.) Open doors between rooms (especially doors to closets which may be colder than the rooms) to increase circulation. Circulation carries heat to the cold surfaces. Increase air circulation by using fans and by moving furniture from wall corners to promote air and heat circulation. Be sure that your house has a source of fresh air and can expel excessive moisture from the home.
  • Pay special attention to carpet on concrete floors. Carpet can absorb moisture and serve as a place for biological pollutants to grow. Use area rugs which can be taken up and washed often. In certain climates, if carpet is to be installed over a concrete floor, it may be necessary to use a vapor barrier (plastic sheeting) over the concrete and cover that with sub-flooring (insulation covered with plywood) to prevent a moisture problem.
  • Moisture problems and their solutions differ from one climate to another. The Northeast is cold and wet; the Southwest is hot and dry; the South is hot and wet; and the Western Mountain states are cold and dry. All of these regions can have moisture problems. For example, evaporative coolers used in the Southwest can encourage the growth of biological pollutants. In other hot regions, the use of air conditioners which cool the air too quickly may prevent the air conditioners from running long enough to remove excess moisture from the air. The types of construction and weatherization for the different climates can lead to different problems and solutions.